Atopic Dermatitis
Acne Vulgaris
Acne
Actinic Keratosis
Acanthosis Nigricans
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Bullous Pemphigoid
Chilblains
Dark Circles
Eczema
Fordyce Condition
Granuloma Annulare
Hidradenitis Suppurativa
Hyperhidrosis
Herpes Simplex
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Impetigo
Keratosis Pilaris
Boils
Bowens Disease
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Molluscum Contagiosum
Pityriasis Alba
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Morton Neuroma
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Tinea Barbae
Tinea Versicolor
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Tinea Corporis
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Thrombophlebitis Deep Venous
Tinea Manuum
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Eczema


Eczema, or dermatitis as it is betimes called, is a group of skin conditions which can affect all age groups. Eczema can influence people of any age, although the condition is most common in infants. Eczema will permanently decipher by age three in about half of affected infants. One of the most common kinds of eczema is atopic dermatitis. Atopic dermatitis is one of the most common skin complications in children. Patches of sensitive skin combust-up in a rash in response to certain triggers. The harshness of the disease can vary.

In mild forms the skin is dry, hot and itchy, whilst in more serious forms the skin can become broken, raw and bleeding. Though it can sometimes look displeasing, eczema is not contagious. Approximately 15 million people in the United States have some form of eczema. It happens in adults and children, but most frequently develop on babies. The term eczema is widely applied to a range of perpetual or recurring skin rashes characterized by redness, skin edema, itching and dryness, with possible crusting, flaking, blistering, cracking, oozing or bleeding.

Eczema is a common condition which isn't life-threatening or contagious. Patches in babies are also common on the neck, wrists, hands, and on the skin over the outside of the elbows or knees. In people having eczema, the instigative response to irritating substances overacts, causing itching and scratching. Eczema is not infectious and, like many diseases, currently cannot be cured. The word "atopic" describes conditions which occur when somebody is overly sensitive to allergens in their environment such as pollens, molds, dust, animal dander, and certain foods.

Eczema isn't contagious like a cold, but most people with eczema have family members with the condition. Dermatitis is a term that is occassionally connected, in people's minds, with exposure to chemicals. With treatment the inflammation of eczema can be reduced, although the skin will always be sensitive to flare-ups and require extra care.

Causes of Eczema

The common causes and risk factor's of Eczema include the following:

  • An abnormal function of the immune system.
  • Afamily history of the Eczema.
  • Rubbing or scratching the skin.
  • Substances that come in contact with the skin, such as soaps, cosmetics, clothing, detergents, jewelry, or sweat.
  • A blood circulatory problems in the legs.
  • A family history of other allergic conditions, such as asthma or hay fever.

Symptoms of Eczema

Some sign and symptoms related to Eczema are as follows:

  • Dry and flaky skin.
  • The rash may spread to the extremities and the trunk.
  • Red, crusted, or open lesions may appear on any area affected.
  • Skin redness.
  • Some people formed red bumps or clear fluid-filled bumps.
  • Skin may feel hot.
  • Painful cracks may arise over time.

Treatment of Eczema

Here is list of the methods for treating Eczema:

  • Apply an nonprescription steroid cream (hydrocortisone) along with anti-itching lotion (menthol/camphor, such as calamine). The cream must be applied as usual as possible without skipping days till the rash is gone.
  • In few cases, a short course of oral corticosteroids (such as prednisone ) is adviced to control an acute outbreak of eczema
  • Antihistamines taken by mouth may be helpful in reducing the itch.
  • The use of anything that may dry out the skin should be discontinued and this includes both normal soaps and bubble baths that remove the natural oils from the skin.
  • Ultra Violet light treatment and stronger medication may be considered for very severe eczema.