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Cherry Angioma


Cherry angioma is a cherry-red to purple colored benignant skin tumor of unknown origin. Cherry angiomas can occur nearly anywhere on the skin, but most commonly on the torso. They rarely arise on the hands or feet. Cherry angiomas are benign, fairly common skin growths which range in size. A cherry angioma is painless and harmless, but several persons want them removed for cosmetic reasons. Cherry angiomas are cherry-red bumps varying from a tiny bespeckle to the size of a pencil eraser.

They are most common after age 40.  Large angiomas can bleed riotously when they are injured. Due to this, don't puncture them or try to remove them yourself. It develops more frequently with speeding age. In the time gone by, the lesions often were referred to as senile angiomas. If cherry angiomas are cut or injured they can bleed lavishly.  Any growth that unexpectedly changes in size, color, shape, bleeds, itches on a regular basis or becomes inflamed or irritated needs to be evaluated by a dermatologist. There are multiple laser treatments for cherry angiomas. 

Cherry angiomas are extremely common and are often frequent. The cherry-red "bumps" mellow alone or in groups, most often on the torso and frequently on the face, scalp, neck, arms and legs. As the blood vessels comprising the angioma are so familiar to the skin's surface, cherry angiomas may bleed profusely if they are injured.

Medical intrusion is not helpful and not indicated in the treatment of the benign vascular proliferations of cherry hemangiomas. As laser treatment is rapid, large numbers of red spots can be cured in a very short period of time. Genetics play a part in the formation of Cherry angiomas. Few families have a tendency to develop  more angiomas than others. The cause is unknown. Though painless and harmless, cherry angiomas may bleed profusely if wounded.

Causes of Cherry angioma

The common causes and risk factor's of Cherry angioma include the following:

  • The exact cause of Cherry angioma is unknown.
  • Painless and harmless, cherry angiomas may bleed profusely if harmed.
  • Genetics perform a role in the formation of Cherry angiomas. 
  • Some families have a ability to develop  more angiomas than others.

Symptoms of Cherry angioma

Some sign and symptoms related to Cherry angioma are as follows:

  • A cherry angioma is painless and harmless.
  • Lesions may be noticable on all body sites, but usually, the mucous membranes are spared.
  • Cherry angioma generally appear on the torso.
  • Bright red lesions.
  • The cherry-red "bumps" develop alone or in groups.

Treatment of Cherry angioma

Here is list of the methods for treating Cherry angioma:

  • Lesions can be cured with electrodessication, liquid nitrogen or laser. Liquid nitrogen is a cold gas which is sprayed on the skin with a spray gun or applied with a cotton swab.
  • The biopsy procedure may be used as a therapeutic measure to remove traumatized or bleeding lesions.
  • The use of a pulsed dye laser with a green light source allows selective absorption of the laser energy by the hemoglobin contained within the red blood cells and subsequent obliteration of the vascular lumen.
  • If the lesions are numerous and appear as small macules, consider a bleeding disorder such as thrombocytopenia.
  • Angiomas sometimes recure after treatment.