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Chancroid


Chancroid is a consigned infectious disease, caused by bacteria called Haemophilis ducreyi. Chancroid is known to be transmit from one to another individual solely through contact. It is also known as, soft chancre and genital sore. It is common in tropical countries but rare in other areas of the world. It is more commonly visible in men than in women, particularly in uncircumcised males. It is characterized by painful ulcers, bubo formation, and painful inguinal lymphadenopathy.

It is a bacterial disease causing painful, intermittently shaped sores, but is a localized infection which can be treated and cured and has no long-term effects. Unsecured or unsafe practices can dramatically increase your risks of developing a transmitted disease. The main symptom is genital sores which rupture after a few days. Chancroid is very common in Africa and is becoming more common in the United States. In nearly 50% of the patients suffering from chancroid, the infection spreads to either or both of the lymph nodes in the groin.

The disease cannot be spread to nurslings during their birth. If chancroid is diagnosed and cured early, it can easily be cured. The ulcer of chancroid also is painful, unlike the ulcer of syphilis which is painless. Chancroid initiates out as a tender bump that emerges 3 to10 days after the exposure. The possibility of transmission is greater if a person is very active and does not maintain personal hygiene. Over 4,000 cases are reported fiscally occurring mainly in younger adults, although it can affect any age.

The diagnosis of chancroid can be corroborated by a culture of the material from within the ulcer for the bacterium Hemophilus ducreyi. Chancroid can be easily diagnosed and treated by your health care supplier. A high rate of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has been observed among patients with chancroid. Chancroid lesions may be complicated to distinguish from ulcers caused by genital herpes or syphilis.

Causes of Chancroid

The common causes and risk factor's of Chancroid include the following:

  • Gram negative bacterium Haemophilus ducreyi.
  • An uncircumcised man is more liable to contract the disease.

Symptoms of Chancroid

Some symptoms related to Chancroid are as follows:

  • The manifestation of one or more sores or raised bumps on the genital organs.
  • The ulcers can be very painful in men but women are often unconscious of them.
  • A base that is covered with a grey.
  • Various lesions merging to form gigantic ulcers.
  • Painful lymph glands may appear in the groin, usually only on one side; however, they can appear on both sides.
  • A rounded painful swelling.

Treatment of Chancroid

Here is list of the methods for treating Chancroid:

  • Chancroid is almost always remedied with a single oral dose of 1 gm of azithromycin (Zithromax) or a single injection of ceftriaxone (Rocephin).
  • Chancroid may be successfully cured with specific antibiotics such asciprofloxin, trimetropin and erythromycin.
  • Salt solution dressings may be applied to the ulcer(s) to lessen the spread of the bacteria and prevent additional ulcers.
  • Buboes may need to be drained with a needle (aspirated) underneath local anesthesia and scarring may happen from those that burst on their own.
  • Streptomycin and ceftriaxone have been shown to be synergistic in the treatment of chancroid.