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Cellulitis


Cellulitis is an underlying tissues which can affect any region of the body. Cellulitis is not to be befuddled with cellulite, which is a cosmetic problem. Cellulitis may further to serious illness by uncontrolled spread conterminously or via the lymphatic or circulatory systems. Cellulitis is most common on the lower legs and the arms or hands, though other areas of the body may sometimes be embraced.

Cellulitis is caused by infection with staphylococcus, streptococcus or other bacteria. Sometimes, however, cellulitis occurs where there has been no rupture in the skin at all. injures. Cellulitis can be caused by normal skin flora or by exogenous bacteria, and usually occurs where the skin has formerly been broken. Bacteria usually penetrate through small breaks in the epidermis that result from scrapes, punctures, burns, and skin disorders such as dermatitis.

Some people with cellulitis experience only mildly ill, but some may have a fever, chills, quick heart rate. People with fungal infections of the feet, who have skin cracks in the webspaces between the toes, may have cellulitis which keeps coming back, as the cracks in the skin propose an opening for bacteria. Cellulitis may be ostensible - affecting only the surface of your skin - but cellulitis may also affect the tissues underlying your skin and can spread to your lymph nodes and bloodstream.

A healthy body with a potent immune system is the best defence against cellulitis. Ludwig's angina is the name offered to cellulitis of the tissues of the floor of the mouth in the area around the submaxillary salivary gland. Cellulitis is severe and someone who has it needs medical attention. Cellulitis requires specifically close monitoring when it infects the eyelid and tissues surrounding the eye. In serious cases, it can spread quickly, within hours or days. Cellulitis is usually not contagious.

Causes of Cellulitis

The common causes and risk factor's of Cellulitis include the following:

  • Infection with staphylococcus, streptococcus or other bacteria.
  • Use of immunosuppressive or corticosteroid medications.
  • Cellulitis can be caused by normal skin flora, and generally happens where the skin has previously been broken.
  • History of peripheral vascular disease.
  • Patients who have diabetes or impairment of the immune system are specifically prone to developing cellulitis.
  • Liposuction, which is a technique to remove excessive fat tissue.
  • Escherichia coli may be documentable for cellulitis in patients with nephrotic syndrome.

Symptoms of Cellulitis

Some sign and symptoms related to Cellulitis are as follows:

  • Pain or tenderness of the area.
  • Fever may be present.
  • Localized skin redness or inflammation that increases in size as the infection spreads.
  • Hair loss at the site of infection.
  • Chills and headaches.
  • Warmth over the area of redness.
  • Joint stiffness caused by swelling of the tissue over the joint.
  • Tight, glossy, stretched appearance of the skin.

Treatment of Cellulitis

Here is list of the methods for treating Cellulitis:

  • Antibiotics are given to regulate infection, and analgesics may be required to control pain.
  • Apply warm, moist compresses to the site aid the body in combating infection by increasing blood supply to the tissues as well as by helping the swelling to subside.
  • Rest the area of the body involved.
  • Agents with a broader spectrum of activity are recommended in selected patients, such as diabetic patients.
  • If the infection is more widespread, or if you're having a slow recovery on oral antibiotics, may be used intravenously (IV) or by injection.
  • Rarely, serious infection may require surgery.